Raise x Rise

Both raise and rise refer to something going up, but there is a difference:

Raise

Raise needs a direct object – if you raise something you move it up. It has both literal and non-literal meanings and it is a regular verb, so it’s past and past participle forms are raised.

  • I raise my eyebrows when I’m surprised.
  • The government plan to raise taxes.
  • He raised his voice at me in anger, but I forgave him.

Rise

Rise does not take a direct object – things rise or go up by themselves. Rise is an irregular verb so the past form is rose and the past participle is risen.

  • The sun rises at 6a.m.
  • The water level rises twice a day because of the tide.
  • The bird rose into the air and flew away.
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